James H. Conway, MD, FAAP, is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin, where he is also very active in Global Health, serving as the Associate Director for Health Sciences in the Global Health Institute.

Dr. Conway’s primary area of interest is with immunization program improvement and he currently has projects investigating influenza transmission and prevention, the effectiveness of pertussis vaccines and understanding issues of vaccine hesitancy.

He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in the Sections on Infectious Diseases and International Child Health, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Wisconsin AAP chapter and as Chair of the Committee on Immunizations and Infectious Diseases. Dr. Conway serves as the AAP representative to the Wisconsin Council on Immunization Practice, and is Chair of the University of Wisconsin Immunization Task Force.

He was given a Special Achievement Award “for distinguished Service and Dedication to the Mission and Goals of the Academy, for leadership and tireless efforts related to immunization projects for the chapter and national AAP, as well as for the United States and around the world.”

In addition, he was selected as the guest commencement speaker by the UW School of Medicine and Public Health’s class of 2012, as well as presented with the Clinical Educator Excellence award in 2012.

News

Spring 2018 News

A Chinese immigrant carried his daughter into Hesburgh Hospital’s Emergency Room in mid-January. She had some cognitive delays and severe scoliosis, and now she was suffering extreme respiratory difficulty. We diagnosed influenza with pneumonia as a complication. She went downhill very fast and sadly died in the ICU within two hours of coming to the ER. Influenza is a concerning public health threat in the U.S., as you all know. It is generally a wintertime virus due, in part, to the concentration of people in warm, enclosed areas. Because the southern hemisphere’s winter falls during the U.S.’s summertime...

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